Explore More this summer at Sky Afterschool

Pricing

$165.00 per week, full day
$105 per week, half day
(pick-up between 11:45-12:00)
$50 per day, drop-in rate
Registration for new students: $65.00

Morning and afternoon snacks are provided.
Children will need to bring their own lunch.

Ages:
Primary Group: 3-year-olds (by Sept. 1, 2022) - 6-year-olds

Elementary Group: 6-year-olds - 12-year-olds

Daily Schedule

6:45 am - Facility Opens/ Early Drop-Off
8:30 am - Activities Begin
9:30 am - Snack
11:45 am - Lunch
11:45-12:00 pm - Half-Day Pick-up
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm - Optional Nap (For children under 5)
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm - Academic Enrichment (Ages 5 and up)
2:30 pm - Snack/Afternoon Activities
3:30 pm - Gym/Playground Time
4:00 pm - Snack
6:00 pm - Facility Closes


Weekly Themes:

My Image

June 5-9: Great Smoky Mountains

  • The Great Smoky Mountains are part of the Appalachian Mountains, which stretch for over 2,000 miles from Canada to Alabama.
  • The Great Smoky Mountains are named for the blue haze that often surrounds them, caused by moisture in the air.
  • The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which encompasses much of the area, is the most visited national park in the United States, with over 12 million visitors per year.
  • The Great Smoky Mountains are home to over 10,000 species of plants and animals, making it one of the most biologically diverse places on Earth.
  • The Great Smoky Mountains are also home to some of the oldest mountains in the world, with some of the rock formations dating back over a billion years.
  • The Great Smoky Mountains were once home to the Cherokee people, who called the area "Shaconage," meaning "land of the blue smoke."
  • The Great Smoky Mountains are a popular destination for outdoor activities like hiking, camping, and fishing, and offer stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
My Image

June 12-16: South American Rain Forest

  • The South American Rainforest, also known as the Amazon Rainforest, covers over 6 million square kilometers and is the largest rainforest in the world.
  • The Amazon Rainforest is home to over 10% of the world's known species of plants and animals, including over 2.5 million species of insects.
  • The Amazon River, which runs through the rainforest, is the largest river in the world by volume and flows for over 4,000 miles.
  • The Amazon Rainforest is home to many indigenous communities, including the Yanomami, Kayap√≥, and Ash√°ninka people, who have lived in the region for thousands of years.
  • The Amazon Rainforest plays a critical role in regulating the Earth's climate, with its trees and plants absorbing and storing billions of tons of carbon dioxide each year.
  • The Amazon Rainforest is often referred to as the "lungs of the Earth," as it produces more than 20% of the world's oxygen.
  • Despite its importance, the Amazon Rainforest is facing significant threats from deforestation, mining, and other forms of development, with an estimated 17% of the forest having been destroyed in the past 50 years.

June 19-23: Sahara Desert

  • The Sahara Desert is the largest hot desert in the world, covering an area of approximately 3.6 million square miles (9.4 million square kilometers).
  • The Sahara Desert is almost as large as the entire continent of Europe.
  • The Sahara Desert is home to a variety of unique plant and animal species, including the dromedary camel, the fennec fox, and the addax antelope.
  • The Sahara Desert is one of the driest places on Earth, with some areas receiving less than an inch (2.5 centimeters) of rain per year.
  • The Sahara Desert is also one of the hottest places on Earth, with temperatures often exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 degrees Celsius).
  • The Sahara Desert is home to a number of historic and cultural sites, including the ancient city of Timbuktu in Mali and the rock paintings at Tassili n'Ajjer in Algeria.
  • Despite its harsh conditions, the Sahara Desert has been inhabited by humans for thousands of years, with evidence of human settlements dating back over 10,000 years.

June 26 - 29: Swiss Alps

  • The Swiss Alps are a mountain range that covers over 60% of Switzerland's land area and also extends into neighboring countries like Italy, France, Austria, and Liechtenstein.
  • The Matterhorn is one of the most famous peaks in the Swiss Alps, standing at 14,692 feet (4,478 meters) tall and located on the border between Switzerland and Italy.
  • The Matterhorn is considered one of the most challenging mountains to climb, with its steep and jagged rock faces, unpredictable weather, and high altitude.
  • The Matterhorn was first successfully climbed in 1865 by Edward Whymper and his team, but the descent resulted in a tragic accident that claimed the lives of four of the climbers.
  • The Swiss Alps are home to a number of other famous peaks, including the Eiger, the Jungfrau, and the Mont Blanc, which is the highest peak in Western Europe.
  • The Swiss Alps are also home to a number of scenic train routes, including the Glacier Express and the Bernina Express, which offer breathtaking views of the mountains and surrounding landscapes.
  • The Swiss Alps are a popular destination for winter sports like skiing and snowboarding, as well as for summer activities like hiking, mountain biking, and paragliding.

July 10-14: Great Wall of China

  • The Great Wall of China is the longest wall in the world, stretching for over 13,000 miles (21,000 kilometers) across northern China.
  • Construction of the Great Wall of China began over 2,000 years ago, during the Qin Dynasty, and continued through the Ming Dynasty, with many different sections being built or rebuilt over time.
  • The Great Wall of China was originally built as a defensive barrier against invading armies from the north, and was manned by soldiers and watchtowers along its length.
  • Despite its name, the Great Wall of China is not a continuous wall, but rather a series of walls, trenches, and natural barriers like mountains and rivers.
  • The Great Wall of China is made up of a variety of materials, including brick, tamped earth, and stone, and its width ranges from 15 to 30 feet (4.5 to 9 meters) in most places.
  • The Great Wall of China is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Medieval World.
  • The Great Wall of China has been featured in many movies and TV shows, including "Mulan," "The Last Emperor," and "Game of Thrones."

July 17-21: Great Barrier Reef

  • The Great Barrier Reef is the world's largest coral reef system, stretching for over 1,400 miles (2,300 kilometers) along the coast of Australia.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is made up of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands, and is home to over 1,500 species of fish, 400 species of coral, and thousands of other marine creatures.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is visible from space and is considered one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is an important source of income and employment for local communities in Australia, and is also a major tourist attraction, drawing millions of visitors each year.
  • The Great Barrier Reef faces many threats, including climate change, pollution, and overfishing, which have contributed to coral bleaching, a process where the coral turns white and dies.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is protected by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, which covers an area of over 133,000 square miles (344,400 square kilometers) and is managed by the Australian government.
  • The Great Barrier Reef is home to a number of unique and iconic species, including the green sea turtle, the humphead wrasse, and the giant clam.

July 24-28: Antarctic Research Station

  • The Antarctic Research Station is a scientific research facility located in Antarctica, at the southernmost point on Earth.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is home to a small community of scientists and support staff, who conduct research on topics such as climate change, geology, biology, and astrophysics.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is owned and operated by various countries around the world, including the United States, Russia, and China.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is one of the most isolated and extreme places on Earth, with temperatures regularly dropping below -100 degrees Fahrenheit (-73 degrees Celsius) and no sunlight for months at a time.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is home to a number of unique and fascinating creatures, such as the emperor penguin, the Weddell seal, and the Antarctic krill.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is important for scientific research, as it provides a unique environment for studying the effects of climate change and other environmental factors on the Earth's ecosystem.
  • The Antarctic Research Station is also a popular destination for adventurers and tourists, who can visit the continent to see its stunning scenery and wildlife, as well as to participate in activities like skiing, ice climbing, and camping.

  • June 5-9: Great Smoky Mountains
  • June 12-16: South American Rain Forest
  • June 19-23: Sahara Desert
  • June 26 - 29: Swiss Alps
  • July 3-7: Closed
  • July 10-14: Great Wall of China
  • July 17-21: Great Barrier Reef
  • July 24-28: Antarctic Research Station
  • July 31- August 4: Games in gym